3321 E Queen Creek Rd #106 Gilbert, AZ 85297

on the SouthEast corner of Higley and Queen Creek Rd

by the Nook and Dairy Queen

Our mission is YOU. What is YOUR mission?

Dry Needling

Drs. Janet Travell (personal physician to John F. Kennedy) and David Simons in the early 1940’s first proposed the use of needles without injectate or medicine with the idea that it was the needle—not the medicine—that stimulated the body to heal the area injected. 

Later, Czech physician, Karel Lewit’s published a study in 1979 showing positive benefits of dry needling in over 80 locations on the body.

Western Medical Acupuncture — Dry Needling

So, what does it do?

Research has shown measurable effects, including:

  • Release of opioids and nor-epinephrine
  • Reduced muscle tone
  • Increased blood flow
  • Angiogenesis
  • Reduced scar tissue adhesion
  • Scar tissue remodeling
  • And desensitization or down-regulation at the spinal cord and brain

It's as if the body or brain perceives the needles as the foreign objects that they are and attacks them.  Or it recognizes the micro trauma caused by the puncture wounds, which resets or jumpstarts the healing process again.

Chinese vs Western Medical

As you may know, acupuncture has been around a long time.  The Eastern Chinese Acupuncture approach uses needles to manipulate the flow of energy (chi) though energy channels (meridians) across the body. Western Medical Acupuncture is anatomical-based.

Is it painful?  Is it safe?
It is very unlikely or rare that a pneumothorax, damage to internal organs, or infection may occur.  We know where to place the needles and where not to!  More common side effects might be soreness similar to a deep massage or mild bruising.

What types of conditions or pathologies can Dry Needling help?  Just about any orthopedic condition!  Arthritis, tendonitis, bursitis, sprains/strains, scar tissue adhesion, muscle guarding—if it hurts and you can put your finger on it, dry needling will likely help!

Training and Qualifications

Acupuncturists spend thousands of hours memorizing acu-points of the body relative to their examination of a person's symptoms or presentation.  Physical therapists spend thousands of hours memorizing the anatomy of the human body, it's muscles, nerves, blood vessels, etc.  Both use the same needles but with very different philosophies.

Why would anyone think that putting a needle in someone would actually help them feel better?!